Where would we be without notions?

People seem to be riddled with notions these days.  What’s that about?  Here are some of the ridiculous notions I’ve had the joy of acquiring during college:

Sarah, did you just enquire about a job?  Have it.
I am employable.
(Notions.)

Study culture, travel, learn, etc.
I am cultured.
(Notions.)

Study linguistics.  It’s the science of language.
I am a scientist.
(Notions.)

Study marketing.
I am going to earn money at some point.
(Notions.)

Do a graphics project.
I am a graphic designer.
(Notions.)

Teach in a Spanish-speaking country, where a teacher is called a ‘profesor’.
I am a professor.
(Notions.)

Build a website.
I am a programmer.
(Notions.)

Write a blog.
I am a writer.
(Notions.)

Study in France.  Eat a croissant.  Go wild.
I am French.
(Notions.)

Write a blog in French.
I am Voltaire.
(Notions.)

Do this project on whatever you like.
I am creative.
(Notions.)

Present your amusing thesis data at a conference.
I am hilarious.
(Notions.)

Play midfield there for the college soccer (B) team.
I am sports star.
I am asthmatic.
(Noti- oh.  That’s unfortunate…)

Really though, where would we be without notions?  If it wasn’t for them, sure why would we do anything?  I’m grateful for each and every notion I’ve acquired over the last few years, and I hope I continue to have notions for the foreseeable future.  Sure who knows where your notions could take you?
(Notions.)

Writing

Oh my god that’s a great idea.

What?

For the blog.  I have an idea for the blog.

Not now.  I’m trying to do an assignment.

But it’s good.

I have a thousand words left to write.

No but you should put this on your blog.

Whisht, I need to concentrate.

Yeah, on the blog.

Stop.

But it’s class.  That assignment’s no craic anyway sure you’ve been putting it off for weeks.

That’s exactly why I really need to focus on it now.

But it’s such effort.

I AM AWARE OF HOW MUCH EFFORT IT IS.

Right.  Back to this literature essay.

I bet that lad didn’t ignore all his class ideas.

Who?

That buck whose book you’re writing about.  Camus is it?

Voltaire.

Anyway, divil a book he’d have written if-

Alright, what is it, what’s your idea?

That’s it.

What?

What you’ve just written.


You wanted me to write about not being able to write?

Yeah lol classic.

Are you serious?

Gets me every time.

You little feck…  Right, I need to get back to this essay.

*Yawns*

*Yawns*
Jeez I’m exhausted.

‘Course you are, sure you’ve spent the last while writing this.  Probably should’ve done that essay when you were more alert.

Are you shitting me?

Would’ve been an idea like.

An idea?  I’ll give you an idea…

No you won’t lol you’re too tired.


I’m going to bed.

Why fourth year is actually the best year of college

Here’s one for my fellow UL crators.

Everyone knows fourth year is tough.  You go into it expecting it to be a nightmare work-wise, and you’re more or less right.  But there are some good points too.

1.  You’ve probably known most of your college friends for two or three years at this stage, meaning proper friendships have been established.  Yurt.

2.  You’re at the stage where you can be yourself with these friends so much that you can let all of the weird out and they’re just used to it now.  (It may even have rubbed off on them.)  Maybe some people did this in first year, but generally for the first few weeks, or even months, most people probably try to tone down any of their crazy, until they can judge how it’ll be perceived, and then unleash it gradually, once they have people trapped in friendships.

3.  You know your way around campus with no trouble whatsoever.  Apart from the main building.  That’s just a maze.

4.  You also probably have a decent idea of how you’ll do in your degree, after having sat a few exams over the past three years.  So if you’re stressing over your grades, you know it’s because you have a certain chance of getting a first degree honours, second or third, etc.  Rather than the panicking that may have happened earlier on in college, having literally no idea what to expect, or if there was a bell curve, or if you’d get a high mark if you just used the subjunctive enough times in French.  Now you kind of know the craic, so you can either relax a bit, or work your ass off while knowing that it will pay off and knowing almost exactly how much work you need to do and how much time you can dedicate to having the craic, focusing on clubs and societies or simply throwing shapes in Icon.

5.  You are a much wiser individual at this point in time, having done three years in college.  For example, if you’re a girl, you now know that a good warm coat is key on a night out, whereas in first year you seemed to have no idea that it got cold in Ireland at night time.

6.  It’s your last year in the place so you and most others in your year are probably going to try to enjoy it.  Craic all over the shop, I’m tellin’ ya.

7.  If you’re doing languages in UL, you get your very own weekly discussion groups all for you fourth years and nobody else (I know right?!  Unreal!) so you don’t have to deal with first year plebs who intrude on your valuable language practice time without even having ‘travelled the world’ first, which of course is a thing you can say you’ve done, if you went to at least one or two countries on co-op and/or erasmus, like the cultured fecker that you are.

8.  If anyone is annoying you, impeding your study or simply occupying a valuable space when the library is full, you now have the right to literally dropkick them out of the library from Week 10 onwards.

Actually maybe google that last one, I’m not 100% sure if it’s right.

Yera.

So, fellow fourth year cratoreens, have an unreal year, and mind yerselves – always remember of course that UL has a free counselling service (like most colleges in Ireland), as well as a number of bars on campus, both potentially useful for when times get tough.

Alors on blog

Comme j’écris maintenant un blog pour mon cours de littérature française, j’ai décidé d’écrire en français icu aussi, pour voir si ça m’aide ou pas.  J’imagine que je vais pas écrire trop souvent mais j’espère que ce que j’écris va améliorer mon français un peu.

C’est tout pour l’instant, malheureusement je dois rentrer à mes devoirs avant d’écrire plus ici.  Mais à bientôt, c’est sûr !

Why I’ve started experimenting with a certain drug

For the first twenty years of my life, I was sober. I somehow managed to defy the Irish stereotype which ultimately results in the notion that we, as a nation, are “fond of the drink”. I avoided the drug for longer than most people expected, or indeed thought was normal, seeing as I got a lot of questioning over it.  Strangely, much more so as an underage non-drinker, which eventually resulted in me sadly giving up on the battle with peer pressure, and having about enough drinks to count on one hand, while I was seventeen.  I then turned eighteen, and decided that because I could now legally drink, it was an ideal time to give up drinking (logical, eh?), not that I’d ever really started.

Yes, the drug I’m talking about is alcohol.  Many people don’t consider it a drug, but it is.  Apparently, it’s more harmful than heroin and cocaine, though that could just be based on the sheer number of people who cause harm to themselves or others because of alcohol, compared to other drugs.  Look at me, referencing things I haven’t a clue about – you’d swear this was an assignment!

I have literally started drinking in the hope that it will improve my college results. No, seriously. This is basically an experiment to see if it will. That or I’ll become a fully fledged alcoholic, only time will tell.

The craic may also secretly be a factor, but it’s more empowering and mildly amusing for me to think of it as a means of helping my education.

I study languages. My course involves a huge amount of travel – we generally spend between a year, and a year and a half of our four-year course, abroad – usually in two different countries. The idea of this, of course, is that we greatly improve upon the languages we study. Naturally, this involves meeting a lot of new people, and often being in situations where you’re both the only outsider, and the only one non-native speaker of the language. It’s often difficult being an outsider when you can speak the local language, but add to this an inability to express yourself clearly, or communicate with others easily, and it makes for some tricky situations.

And that’s where the alcohol comes in. I’ve both noticed, and been told, that alcohol makes people talk more.  Even when it’s not in a language they’re fluent in – that doesn’t matter. The alcohol doesn’t care. It just thinks you should speak. A lot. So you do.

(Not exactly a groundbreaking discovery here, but, as I may have hinted before, speaking a language actually helps you improve it. Probably more so than any other form of study.)

Basically, I could spend all day in the library studying French grammar, or I could go out in a French-speaking area, have a few drinks, and chat away with people in French for the night. The latter sounds like more fun, and could very well be more beneficial. Yes, it’s times like this that I rediscover my love for my course. You know, when our assignments are basically to go travel and have the craic in whatever languages we’re studying (*ahem* as well as, of course, work and study and all that…), rather than readings and essays and the likes.

Sure, I can easily talk plenty without alcohol, but I’ve found that it requires a lot of effort, sometimes, and that even when I’m confident enough in my ability to communicate, I end up being really quiet in large groups.  Or just in general, when it comes to languages other than English. I’m used to embarrassing myself by needing a few attempts at saying what I’m trying to say, or simply saying things incorrectly, or being misunderstood because of my accent (if I had a euro for every time someone thought I said I was from ‘Holanda’, or ‘Hollande’, instead of ‘Irlanda’, or ‘Irlande’…). I don’t care as much about that anymore. But I’ve found that when I am brave enough to chat in groups, that it sometimes takes me a while to pluck up the courage to do so, or that I simply don’t do it enough. And it’s sad relying on alcohol to counteract that, but honestly, it’s way easier, and far more efficient.  (I’m lazy.)

So there you go. I really have given up being a non-drinker for the purpose of language learning. That, and I won’t lie, after a few years you do get a little sick of being completely sober while a minority of extremely drunk people are generally just being irritating on nights out (the majority of course being great craic – genuinely, otherwise I wouldn’t be out with them), but I don’t think that alone would have caused me to start drinking.

*Spoiler* I’ll probably return to the non-drinker life again soon enough.  That or I’ll just continue to barely drink, being the lightweight that I am, and will probably have more non-alcoholic nights out than ones where I drink, even if people don’t seem to get why I’d want to do that.  At least if I quit, I’ll now finally get to say “I’ve been sober for X months/years”, which might be a fun challenge to keep track of.  That and maybe people would react more positively to that than the old “yeah I never really drank” line.

And that concludes this episode of reasons to drink, according to Sarah.

Cheers.

(I’m sorry okay I’m terrible for attempting to make puns, or laughing at even the worst ones.  I don’t think that even counts.)

 

(If you’re wondering why I avoided alcohol for so long, seeing as most people ask, or at least are probably a little curious about it, I’ll get to that another day, it would take far too long to explain in this post.)

Coin Flip

On Sunday, my inability to make a decision finally resulted in me choosing to flip a coin, to help me figure out what I wanted.  And I’d been told that when you flip a coin to make a serious decision, it results in you generally realising what you want before the coin even lands.  Maybe that knowledge messed it up for me because in the time the coin was flipped into the air, spun and caught, all my mind was telling me was “I don’t know”.  I actually couldn’t decide.  The coin failed.  I failed.

Except I think I just had a delayed reaction to the coin flip, or it it didn’t have the same effect because I was so aware that it was going to make me decide so I panicked, was sort of scared, and couldn’t think.  Even a minute later, when I was told the coin had said ‘heads’ – which we had chosen to mean I would stay in France for the year – my reaction was disappointment.  I knew that it would have been the same if they had said it was tails, but from that moment on, and taking into account some advice from college friends who’d all already made their decisions long ago and without much difficulty, I started seriously thinking about leaving my erasmus at just one semester, instead of extending it to two.

I think I made my mind up on the day, within  an hour of  the coin flip, but I’ve been pondering it since to make sure I’m doing the right thing.

Don’t get me wrong, I’d still love to stay for the year, or come back to this town to live here for a while, but I think going home is the right decision.  If I stayed it would probably make college much more difficult, between various modules, and most of all, the equivalent of a thesis that we have to write at some point in the next year and a half.  Seeing as it’s half of third year and all of fourth year we’re talking about here, I’d rather not make things any more complicated than they should be.

I’ve had a massive weight lifted off my shoulders after that anyway.  Fully recommend making serious decisions at least a few days before the deadline (and no later) to everyone.  Except that’s generally what people do, isn’t it?  Yeah…  Well, I tried.  This is a much better result than my last few major academic decisions, which were made either on deadline day, or when it was too late.  Great day for the parish.

Full Year Erasmus – Yay or Nay?

I struggle  so much with decisions that for my next serious one – that of staying on erasmus for a year or not – I’ve decided to compile a list of pros and cons for staying, and, in an attempt to make it even more accurate to what on earth would be best, I’ve actually weighted each pro and con by giving them a value based on how important they actually are.  Yeah I’m not even joking I honestly feel the list is necessary just to attempt to come close to a decision, and well, the weighting of each point just seems like the right to do to me and my apparently overly logical brain.

It makes sense, I swear.  I mean there were several arguments for and against that got zero points because they’re really not important in the grand scheme of things.

As it happens, I then discovered that as well as simply adding up the points for each side, I could also obviously change that into a percentage, and as we all know percentages are always more fun.  Go maths.

So, the current tally on the Full Year Erasmus – Yay or Nay? vote stands at:

Yay:  54%

Nay:  46%

Does that kind of highlight my indecision, just a tad?  I mean it couldn’t be much closer, it’s like the Scottish referendum all over again.

And I haven’t even finished the pros and cons list, not quite.

If I hadn’t weighted each pro and con, it would have resulted in the no vote being up 0.65% to a round figure of 47% versus 53% for a yes to staying for a year.

(I’m clearly having withdrawal symptoms ever since I stopped studying maths back when I finished school, leave me be.)

At this rate I’ll nearly have to resort to doing what I feared I’d end up having to do and just flip a coin over it.  And I’m not doing that…  I hope.

I’ve got about a week to make up my mind.  Wish me luck.

Any if you’ve any thoughts on whether a full year erasmus might be a good idea or not, feel free to let me know!